The Science of Success

Our DDS Class of 2009
Our DDS Class of 2009

A key component of our school’s mission statement is to “actualize individual potential” and one of our core values is Humanism (dignity, integrity, responsibility). In other words, we aspire to help individuals become everything that they are capable of through our supportive and encouraging environment.

I’ve often wondered why the humanistic model of education is such an important part of the culture and success at the Dugoni School of Dentistry. Why do so many students, residents, faculty, and staff thrive as members of the Pacific family? Is there any science that explains why our model works?

Here’s something to ponder. Many years ago, Abraham Maslow developed a theory of personality that influenced a number of different fields, including education. He theorized that individuals can only self-actualize when certain basic needs are achieved in a specific order. His hierarchy theory is often represented as a pyramid with physiological needs (e.g. oxygen, food) at the base; followed by safety needs; needs for love affection and belongingness; needs for esteem; and at the top, needs for self-actualization. When the environment is supportive, individuals will grow and actualize the potential they have inherited.

Maslow believed that the only reason people did not move well in the direction of self-actualization is because of hindrances placed in their way by society. He stated that education could be one of these hindrances and we need to switch from “person-stunting” tactics to “person-growing” approaches.

At Pacific, we’ve definitely adopted the person-growing approach. Our humanistic family environment fosters a feeling of mutual respect, dignity, and self-worth. Our approach to dental education is to create a supportive environment for teaching, learning, and working.

I agree with my mentor and friend Dr. Art Dugoni who said, “I am firmly convinced that we must not just develop superior dentists to succeed as dentists but rather individuals who have truly learned the meaning of life: the ability to express themselves; and the willingness to improve, to listen, and to grow through meaningful experiences with other human beings. What greater gift can we give to our students than the development of their own self worth? This special ingredient says to every individual that they are worthwhile, they are important.”

So this year, as we graduate another group of outstanding students and residents, and celebrate another year of achievement and accomplishment, take the time to think about our fantastic model of education. There’s science behind our success.